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Our Colon is Full of Something... And It's Not What You Think!!

Updated: Mar 18, 2023


The human body is home to trillions of bacteria, many of which live in the gastrointestinal tract. These bacteria are known as gut microbiota, and they play a vital role in our overall health and well-being.

The gut microbiota is made up of both good and bad bacteria. The good bacteria are known as probiotics and are essential for maintaining a healthy gut. Probiotics help to break down food, produce vitamins, and help to fight off harmful bacteria. They also play a vital role in supporting our immune system and regulating our metabolism.


Latest Research

Recent research has shown that the gut microbiota plays a significant role in our overall health. A study published in the journal Nature found that the gut microbiota is essential for regulating our immune system. The study showed that when the gut microbiota is disrupted, the immune system is also disrupted, leading to inflammation and disease.

Another study published in the journal Cell Host and Microbe found that the gut microbiota plays a crucial role in regulating our metabolism. The study showed that the gut microbiota helps to regulate our energy balance and can affect our risk of developing obesity and diabetes. We have links at the bottom of this page to studies, some exclusively related to diverticulosis.

  1. Gut Microbiota and Cardiovascular Health: Recent studies have suggested that the gut microbiota may play a role in cardiovascular health. A study published in the journal Nature found that the gut microbiota can produce metabolites that may reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease. Another study published in the Journal of the American Heart Association found that a diet rich in fruits, vegetables, and whole grains was associated with a healthier gut microbiota and a reduced risk of cardiovascular disease.

  2. Gut Microbiota and Autoimmune Diseases: Autoimmune diseases occur when the immune system attacks the body's own cells and tissues. Recent research has suggested that the gut microbiota may play a role in the development of autoimmune diseases. A study published in the journal Cell Host and Microbe found that certain bacteria in the gut microbiota may trigger autoimmune responses in the body. Another study published in the journal Science Translational Medicine found that patients with autoimmune diseases had a different composition of gut microbiota compared to healthy individuals.

  3. Gut Microbiota and Obesity: Obesity is a major public health concern worldwide. Recent research has suggested that the gut microbiota may play a role in the development of obesity. A study published in the journal Nature found that the gut microbiota of obese individuals had a different composition compared to healthy individuals. Another study published in the journal Gut found that a high-fat diet can lead to changes in the gut microbiota that may contribute to the development of obesity.

  4. Gut Microbiota and Mental Health: Recent studies have suggested that the gut microbiota may play a role in mental health. A study published in the journal Frontiers in Microbiology found that the gut microbiota can produce neurotransmitters that may affect mood and behavior. Another study published in the journal PLOS ONE found that patients with depression had a different composition of gut microbiota compared to healthy individuals.

  5. Gut Microbiota and Cancer: Recent studies have suggested that the gut microbiota may play a role in the development of cancer. A study published in the journal Science found that certain bacteria in the gut microbiota can promote the growth of cancer cells. Another study published in the journal Nature found that the gut microbiota can influence the efficacy of cancer treatments.


Good Bacteria in the Human Intestinal Tract

There are several types of good bacteria found in the human intestinal tract. Some of the most common types of good bacteria include:

  1. Lactobacillus - Lactobacillus is a type of probiotic that is commonly found in the intestines and vagina. This bacteria helps to break down food, produce vitamins, and helps to fight off harmful bacteria.

  2. Bifidobacterium - Bifidobacterium is another type of probiotic that is commonly found in the intestines. This bacteria helps to break down food, produce vitamins, and helps to support a healthy immune system.

  3. Streptococcus - Streptococcus is a type of probiotic that is commonly found in the mouth and intestines. This bacteria helps to break down food and supports a healthy immune system.

  4. Escherichia coli - Escherichia coli (E. coli) is a type of probiotic that is commonly found in the intestines. This bacteria helps to break down food, produces vitamin K, and helps to prevent harmful bacteria from growing.

Benefits of Good Bacteria

Good bacteria in the human intestinal tract have many benefits. Some of the benefits of good bacteria include:

  1. Improved Digestion - Good bacteria help to break down food, making it easier for our bodies to digest and absorb nutrients.

  2. Boosted Immune System - Good bacteria help to support a healthy immune system by producing antibodies and preventing harmful bacteria from growing.

  3. Reduced Inflammation - Good bacteria help to reduce inflammation in the gut, which can lead to a reduction in chronic diseases.

  4. Improved Mental Health - Good bacteria in the gut have been shown to have a significant impact on mental health. A study published in the journal Brain, Behavior, and Immunity found that good bacteria in the gut can reduce symptoms of anxiety and depression.

Ways to Increase Good Bacteria

There are several ways to increase the number of good bacteria in the human intestinal tract. Some of the ways to increase good bacteria include:

  1. Eating a Healthy Diet - A healthy diet that is rich in fiber and nutrients can help to increase the number of good bacteria in the gut.

  2. Taking Probiotic Supplements - Probiotic supplements can help to increase the number of good bacteria in the gut. It is essential to choose a high-quality probiotic supplement that contains strains of bacteria that have been shown to be effective.

  3. Eating Fermented Foods - Fermented foods such as yogurt, kefir, and sauerkraut contain live bacteria that can help to increase the number of good bacteria in the gut.

  4. Avoiding Antibiotics - Antibiotics can disrupt the balance of good bacteria in the gut, so it is essential to only take antibiotics when necessary.

  5. Managing Stress - Stress can have a negative impact on the gut microbiota, so it is essential to manage stress levels to support a healthy gut.

  6. Getting Enough Sleep - Sleep is crucial for the health of the gut microbiota. Lack of sleep can disrupt the balance of good bacteria in the gut and increase the risk of developing gut-related health problems.

Conclusion

The human intestinal tract is home to trillions of bacteria, many of which are essential for maintaining a healthy gut. Good bacteria, also known as probiotics, play a vital role in breaking down food, producing vitamins, and supporting a healthy immune system. Recent research has shown that gut microbiota plays a significant role in our overall health and well-being, and disruption of the gut microbiota can lead to inflammation and disease.

Several good bacteria are found in the human intestinal tract, including Lactobacillus, Bifidobacterium, Streptococcus, and Escherichia coli. These bacteria have many benefits, including improved digestion, a boosted immune system, reduced inflammation, and improved mental health.


There are several ways to increase the number of good bacteria in the gut, including eating a healthy diet, taking probiotic supplements, eating fermented foods, avoiding antibiotics, managing stress, and getting enough sleep.

Maintaining a healthy balance of good bacteria in the gut is essential for overall health and well-being. By making small changes to our diet and lifestyle, we can support a healthy gut microbiota and improve our overall health. Additional helpful links are below!





Here are some helpful links!


Diverticulosis-Related Links:
"Intestinal microbiota and the pathogenesis of diverticular disease": This study published in the World Journal of Gastroenterology discusses the relationship between intestinal microbiota and the development of diverticular disease. The authors suggest that alterations in the gut microbiota may contribute to the development of diverticulosis and diverticulitis. Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4621863/
"The microbiota in diverticular disease": This review article published in Current Opinion in Pharmacology examines recent studies on the gut microbiota and diverticular disease. The authors discuss the potential role of the gut microbiota in the development and progression of diverticulitis. Link: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1471489218301565
"Gut microbiota and diverticular disease": This study published in the Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology examines the association between gut microbiota and diverticular disease. The authors suggest that changes in the gut microbiota may contribute to the pathogenesis of diverticular disease. Link: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/jgh.14398
"Alterations in intestinal microbiota in patients with acute and chronic diverticulitis": This study published in the Journal of Gastrointestinal Surgery examines changes in the gut microbiota in patients with acute and chronic diverticulitis. The authors found that patients with acute and chronic diverticulitis had different compositions of gut microbiota compared to healthy individuals. Link: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11605-018-3917-y

Gut Microbiota and Cardiovascular Health:

  • "Gut microbiota-generated metabolites in cardiovascular health and disease": https://www.nature.com/articles/s41569-019-0210-9

  • "Dietary patterns and gut microbiome composition and functions in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study": https://www.ahajournals.org/doi/full/10.1161/JAHA.119.012923

Gut Microbiota and Autoimmune Diseases:

  • "Autoimmunity to hypocretin and molecular mimicry to flu in type 1 narcolepsy": https://www.cell.com/cell-host-microbe/fulltext/S1931-3128(19)30206-5

  • "Alterations of the human gut microbiome in multiple sclerosis": https://stm.sciencemag.org/content/8/323/323ra18

Gut Microbiota and Obesity:

  • "An obesity-associated gut microbiome with increased capacity for energy harvest": https://www.nature.com/articles/nature05414

  • "Dietary fat drives whole-body insulin resistance and promotes intestinal inflammation independent of body weight gain": https://gut.bmj.com/content/69/11/1984.long

Gut Microbiota and Mental Health:

  • "Gut microbiome and depression: what we know and what we need to know": https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fmicb.2020.609635/full

  • "Gut microbiota composition in patients with newly diagnosed bipolar disorder and their unaffected first-degree relatives": https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0213549

Gut Microbiota and Cancer:

Check out other informative posts at Viva Gastro!


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